Clicky

Home » Florida » 8 Best Types of Mango Trees to Grow in Florida

8 Best Types of Mango Trees to Grow in Florida


This article may contain affiliate links. We may earn a small commission if you purchase via these links.

To many, mango is the king of fruits!

This extremely popular fruit tree is native to the Indian Subcontinent, but today you will find them growing throughout the frost-free world.

Few fruits compare in taste to a sweet and delicious mango. I am sure that the endless mango lovers around the world would agree.

Mango season usually lasts from May through September in Florida. Some, such as Carrie mangos, have an earlier harvest, while Lancetilla mangos ripen at the end of the season. 

Even when mangos are not in season, the large and fragrant leaves give the landscape a lush tropical feel

If you are going to put in the effort to grow a mango tree, I am sure you want to make sure you like the taste and texture of the type of mango you plant. For example, some are mildly sweet, while others are intensely sweet. 

This article is perfect for you if you want to determine which mango suits your taste preferences and which can fit into your yard space.  

8 Delicious Mangos that You Should Grow in Florida

1. ‘Tommy Atkins’ (Mangifera indica ‘Tommy Atkins’)

Mango Tommy Atkins
Image by Asit K Ghosh via Wikimedia commons (CC 3.0)

Tommy Atkins mango is the classic commercial mango. It is popular because of its color, disease resistance, and ability to store for long periods.

Tommy Atkins mangos have dark red blush with shades of green and yellow. The flavor is sweet with sour notes – not the best-tasting mango.

Who should plant this mango variety? Those who want to grow mangos commercially or who want mangos that can sit on the counter for a few days without spoiling.

USDA Growing Zones: 9b – 11

Average Size at Maturity: 10 – 12 feet tall with an equal spread

Harvest Season: June -July

2. ‘Carrie’ (Mangifera indica ‘Carrie’)

Mango Carrie
Image by Asit K Ghosh via Wikimedia commons (CC 3.0)

As a mango lover, I hate when the strings get stuck in my teeth. One of the best mangos for those who also can’t stand this feeling is the Carrie mango.

Carrie mangos have a rich and sweet flavor. At first glance, it may not appear ripe because the skin stays green even when it’s ready to eat. You will know it is ripe when the fruit is soft and gives off a strong sweet smell.

Another perk of planting this variety is its strong resistance to fungi and diseases. Also, Carrie is great for containers and patio areas because of its compact size.

USDA Growing Zones: 9B – 11

Average Size at Maturity: 10 – 15 feet tall with a similar spread

Harvest Season: June – July

3. ‘Haden’ (Mangifera indica ‘Haden’)

Mango Haden
Image by Asit K Ghosh via Wikimedia commons (CC 3.0)

Haden was the first superior-quality mango cultivar named in Florida.

This mango features a bright deep yellow color with a crimson blush. The flesh has a sweet flavor, earning tons of praise from mango fans.

Haden mangos are fast and vigorous growers; with enough sunshine and water, a seedling could reach maturity in five years. These trees are perfect for anyone with a big yard.

Unfortunately, this cultivar does not have a strong disease and fungus resistance.

USDA Growing Zones: 9b – 11

Average Size at Maturity: 15 – 20 feet tall with an equal spread

Harvest Season: June – July

4. ‘Alphonso’ (Mangifera indica ‘Bombay’)

Alphonso mango
Image by G patkar via Wikimedia commons (Public Domain)

Alphonso mangos have a unique flavor. It’s like a combination of citrus, honey, apricot, peach, and melon. Also, the texture of the flesh is smooth.

These mangos have a greenish-yellow to yellow shade when ripe. The flesh is juicy, deep orange, and richly aromatic.

Alphonso mango trees do well in areas with high rainfall and humidity. For this reason, they are perfect for south Florida.

USDA Growing Zones: 9b – 11

Average Size at Maturity: 10 – 15 feet tall with a similar spread

Harvest Season: June – July

5. ‘Valencia Pride’ (Mangifera indica ‘Valencia Pride’)

Valencia Pride Mango
Image by Asit K Ghosh via Wikimedia commons (CC 3.0)

Like Alphonso mangos, Valencia Pride has a unique and interesting flavor. The fruits are aromatic, sweet, with a pleasant floral flavor. Also, the flesh is firm and fibreless, which makes it easier to eat.

Most mango are ready for harvest between May to July. A great way to extend your harvest window is to plant early and late season varieties if you have the space. A late season variety like Valencia Pride is a great choice.

USDA Growing Zones: 9b – 11

Average Size at Maturity: 25 feet tall with a similar spread

Harvest Season: July – August

6. ‘Nam Doc Mai’ (Mangifera indica ‘Nam Doc Mai’)

Nam Doc Mai Mango
Image by Trisorn Triboon via Wikimedia commons (CC 4.0)

Like Alphonso mangos, Valencia Pride has a unique and exciting flavor. The fruits are aromatic and sweet, with a pleasant floral flavor. Also, the flesh is firm and fibreless, which makes it easier to eat.

Most mangoes are ready for harvest between May to July. A great way to extend your harvest window is to plant early and late-season varieties if you have the space. A late-season variety like Valencia Pride is a great choice.

USDA Growing Zones: 9b – 11

Average Size at Maturity: 10 – 15 feet tall with a similar spread

Harvest Season: June – July

7. ‘Cogshall’ (Mangifera indica ‘Cogshall’) – South Florida

Cogshall Mango
Image by Asit K Ghosh via Wikimedia commons (CC 3.0)

Cogshall is a native Florida mango tree – from southwest Florida. It is a compact tree which makes it suitable for tight spaces, balconies, and patios. 

This mango type has a great rich sweet flavor. Also, it is fiberless and very juicy. This excellent flavor profile makes this mango type one of the most sought-after in Florida. 

USDA Growing Zones: 9b – 11

Average Size at Maturity: 10 – 20 feet tall with a similar spread

Harvest Season: June – July

8. ‘Lancetilla’ (Mangifera indica ‘Lancetilla’)

Lancetilla Mango
Image by Asit K Ghosh via Wikimedia commons (CC 3.0)

Lancetilla mango is native to Honduras and popular in South Florida. This mango type is known for its excellent disease resistance.

The fruits are relatively large, weight 2 to 5 pounds. They are intensely sweet and without fibers. 

I recommend getting three mango trees to get fruits from June through September if you have yard space.

You can pick one with an earlier harvest, such as Cogshall or HadenValencia pride for an August harvest, and Lancetilla to close off the mango season. 

USDA Growing Zones: 9B – 11

Average Size at Maturity: 10 – 15 feet tall with a similar spread

Harvest Season: August – September

How to Successfully Grow Mango Trees in Florida

Mango trees are popular in Florida, especially South Florida because one tree can provide lots of juicy and sweet fruit.

Most Florida landscapers, including myself, will tell you that the work it takes to grow a mango tree is worth the effort. For example, Nam Doc Mai is a small tree that produces lots of fruit each year. 

Growing mangoes in Florida is notoriously tricky. Many mango trees flower in the winter months. Sometimes frosts don’t kill the trees, but most or all of the blooms, which means a disappointing harvest for that year. 

My grandparents live in Central Florida and complain about frosts killing the flowers or young fruits every two to three years. 

Knowing your USDA Florida hardiness zone is essential when you grow tropical fruits like mangos or avocados. For example, if you are in zones 9a or 9b, you know that you should protect your mango trees from occasional frosts in the winter. 

It would help if you planted all of the above mango types in a spot with full sun. Provide the trees with a moderate amount of rainfall throughout the year. They do best in well-draining sandy loam soil. 

You can feed healthy trees with lots of fruit with a low-nitrogen blend three times a year. Of course, organic mango fertilizers are available at Home Depot and other garden centers. 

Related Articles: