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14 Fastest Growing Pear Trees That Bear Fruit Quickly (1st Year)

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Who wants to wait 4-6 years to eat pears from their tree?

If you are a bit impatient (like me) this list of pear trees that grow the fastest, and more importantly bear fruit the fastest, is for you!

Some of these trees can bear pears in the first year after planting!

Beautiful Pear Trees That Fruit Fast

1. Shinseiki AsianPyrus pyrifolia ‘Shinseiki’

Shinseiki Asian pear trees can bear fruit in their first 1-2 years after planting, according to My Perfect Plants.

The Shinseiki Asian pear tree, Pyrus pyrifolia, is a gardener’s delight, blending the sweet flavors of pears with the satisfying crunch of apples.

Suited for warmer climates with its modest chill requirements of 300-400 hours, it’s an easy-to-grow, low-maintenance option that quickly begins to bear fruit.

Self-pollinating yet benefiting from the presence of other Asian pear varieties for enhanced fruit production, the Shinseiki produces bright yellow, crisp, and slightly tart fruits perfect for various culinary uses.

Ideal for USDA zones 5-9, this quick fruiting tree not only offers abundant, delicious fruit but also adds beauty to any space with its vibrant foliage and early ripening fruits.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5-9
  • Mature Tree Size: 12-15 ft tall and 12-15 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: 1-2 years*
  • Avg Growth Rate: 1-2 ft per year
  • Chill Hours: 300-400
  • Self Fertile: Yes, with enhanced production when cross-pollinated, especially with varieties like Shinko

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2. Shinko AsianPyrus pyrifolia ‘Shinko’

Shinko Asian pear trees can bear fruit in their first 1-2 years after planting, according to My Perfect Plants.

The Shinko Asian Pear tree, a prized cultivar of Pyrus pyrifolia, is an excellent choice for northern climates, offering the luxury of home-grown fruit that stores well into winter.

With its white spring blooms, attractive grey bark, and glossy green leaves, it adds both beauty and bounty to your garden.

The golden brown, round fruits are sweet, crisp, and perfect for fresh consumption, desserts, and canning.

Ready for harvest in early to mid-September, these medium-sized fruits can be enjoyed throughout the winter.

Adapted to USDA zones 4-9, the Shinko pear is notably pest and disease-resistant, thriving in full sun and well-drained soils.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4-9
  • Mature Tree Size: 12-15 ft tall, 12-15 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: 1-2 years*
  • Avg Growth Rate: 1-2 ft per year
  • Chill Hours: 400-500
  • Self Fertile: Partially – benefits from cross-pollination with other Asian pear varieties like the Shinseiki for optimal fruit production

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3. Bartlett PearPyrus communis ‘Bartlett’

Bartlett pear trees can bear fruit in their first year after planting, according to Fast-Growing Trees.

The Bartlett pear tree, internationally renowned as the Williams pear outside the United States, dominates global pear sales thanks to its deliciously sweet flavor, ideal for both fresh consumption and culinary uses.

Originating from Europe and brought to the U.S. in the late 18th century, it has become a staple in commercial orchards, particularly in California and the Pacific Northwest.

Distinguished by its vibrant, white spring blossoms and rapid growth, the Bartlett pear matures from green to a rich golden hue.

This quick fruiting variety is known for its adaptability to preservation methods, maturing in one to three years, and its fruit’s nutritional benefits, including fiber, vitamins, and minerals, making it a versatile choice for gardeners and cooks alike.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5-9
  • Mature Tree Size: 12-20 ft tall, 12-20 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: 1-3 years*
  • Avg Growth Rate: 1-2 ft per year
  • Chill Hours: 500-1000
  • Self Fertile: Partial – Pollinates with Bosc, Comice or D’Anjou

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4. Beurre BoscPyrus communis ‘Bosc’

Bosc pear trees can bear fruit in their first year after planting, according to Fast-Growing-Trees.

The Bosc Pear, is celebrated for its late harvest period, extending the pear season well into winter.

Known for its distinctive shape, with a long, slender neck and large size, the Bosc is beloved for both its aesthetic appeal and its culinary versatility.

This pear variety blooms in mid-April with white blossoms, and its fruit, which develops over the summer, is ready for harvest by late September.

Unique for its early sweetening, the Bosc Pear’s flesh is firm, slightly acidic, and subtly spicy, making it perfect for both fresh consumption and cooking.

Remarkably low maintenance and an abundant producer, the quick fruiting Bosc Pear can yield fruit for up to a century, offering a significant lifespan of bountiful harvests.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4-9
  • Mature Tree Size: 12-15 ft tall, 12-18 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: 1-3 years*
  • Avg Growth Rate: 1-2 ft per year
  • Chill Hours: 300-600
  • Self Fertile: No – Pollinates with Bartlett, Comice or D’Anjou

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5. KiefferPyrus communis ‘Kieffer’

Kieffer pear trees can bear fruit in their first year after planting, according to Fast-Growing-Trees.

The Kieffer Pear tree is resilient and versatile, offering exceptionally large fruits known for their crisp, juicy texture and preferred taste.

Rooted in a rich history dating back to the 1800’s, this variety excels in both cold and hot climates, demonstrating remarkable drought tolerance and adaptability to various soil types.

Not only does it promise a bountiful harvest of delicious pears ideal for cooking and snacking, but it also ensures a legacy, as these strong trees with lifelong roots become a treasure for many generations.

The Kieffer Pear is self-fertile, yet benefits from the presence of another for a significantly larger crop, making it a favored choice among pear enthusiasts.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4-9
  • Mature Tree Size: 15-25 ft tall, 5-10 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: 1-3 years*
  • Avg Growth Rate: 1-2 ft per year
  • Chill Hours: 300-500
  • Self Fertile: Yes – Plant with Chojuro, Bartlett or 20th Century Varieties for enhanced pollination. Alternatively you can simply buy an additional Kieffer pear tree.

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6. Beurre D’AnjouPyrus communis ‘D’Anjou’

D’Anjou pear trees can bear fruit in their first year after planting, according to Fast-Growing-Trees.

The D’Anjou Pear Tree, celebrated for its buttery, sweet pears, exemplifies horticultural excellence with its rich flavor that matures and enhances over time.

This tree is very adaptable, thriving in diverse conditions from cold to drought, making it an ideal choice for a wide range of climates.

Requiring a pollinator such as the Bosc or Bartlett pear for optimal fruit production, the D’Anjou is a heavy producer, offering a bounty of fruit that can last for months post-harvest.

Its easy growth and early bearing make it a favorite, delivering not just delightful fruit but also serving as a durable and resilient addition to any garden.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5-9
  • Mature Tree Size: 8-15 ft tall, 6-10 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: 1-3 years*
  • Avg Growth Rate: 1-2 ft per year
  • Chill Hours: 500-600
  • Self Fertile: No – Pollinates well with Bartlett, Bosc, or Comice

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7. HosuiPyrus pyrifolia ‘Hosui’

Hosui pear trees can bear fruit in their first year after planting, according to Fast-Growing-Trees.

The Hosui pear, celebrated for its exceptional taste, features large, juicy fruits with a crisp texture reminiscent of apples, evolving from pale green to golden bronze as they ripen.

Adaptable from zones 5 to 9, this cold-hardy and heat-tolerant tree is also drought-resistant, making it an easy-to-grow choice for a wide range of climates.

Beyond its delicious fruit, the Hosui pear tree offers ornamental value with its seasonal transformations—from spring flowers to autumn’s bright red leaves.

It’s self-fertile, promising fruit with just one tree, yet yields improve with cross-pollination. This tree not only produces tasty pears by mid-August but also serves as a striking addition to any landscape.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5-9
  • Mature Tree Size: 8-10 ft tall, 6-7 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: 1-3 years*
  • Avg Growth Rate: 1-2 ft per year
  • Chill Hours: 400-700
  • Self Fertile: Yes – Plant with Chojuro, Bartlett or 20th Century Varieties for enhanced pollination

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8. Pineapple PearPyrus communis ‘Pineapple’

Pineapple Pear - Pyrus communis 'Pineapple' - fruit on tree

Pineapple pear trees can bear fruit in their first 1-3 years after planting, according to My Perfect Plants.

The Pineapple Pear Tree, enjoyed for its unique, slightly pineapple-flavored fruit, is a robust addition to home gardens, recalling the cherished memories of grandma’s fresh pears.

This self-fertile variety, known scientifically as Pyrus communis ‘Pineapple,’ boasts hard-cooking pears and strong vertical growth with minimal pruning needs.

Blooming in early spring, it yields large fruits by July-August, with an enhanced harvest when cross-pollinated.

Adaptable to a range of soils, including heavy clays, and somewhat resistant to fire blight, it’s a low-maintenance choice for USDA zones 5-9, especially thriving in Florida’s climate.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5-9
  • Mature Tree Size: 20-25 ft tall, 15-20 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: 1-3 years*
  • Avg Growth Rate: Not explicitly mentioned, but described as having “strong vertical growth”
  • Chill Hours: 200
  • Self Fertile: Yes, but cross-pollination is recommended for better fruit production

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9. MoonglowPyrus communis ‘Moonglow’

Moonglow - Pyrus communis 'Moonglow' - pears on tree

Moonglow pear trees can bear fruit in 2-3 years after planting, according to My Perfect Plants.

The Moonglow Pear tree, scientifically known as Pyrus Communis ‘Moonglow’, is a fruitful and low-maintenance addition to any garden, offering medium to large, juicy pears with a blush pink hue when ripe.

This variety is enjoyed for its Bartlett-like fruit that is low in acid and rich in vitamins, making it both delicious and nutritious.

It flourishes in USDA hardiness zones 5-9, requiring at least 500 chill hours for successful fruit set.

The Moonglow pear is resistant to fire blight and other common pests and diseases, making it an ideal choice for both new and experienced gardeners.

It’s not self-fertile, requiring a pollinator like the Bartlett pear for optimal fruit production.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5-9
  • Mature Tree Size: 8-10 ft tall, 5-10 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: 2-3 years*
  • Avg Growth Rate: 1-2 ft per year
  • Chill Hours: 500
  • Self Fertile: No – requires a pollinator like Bartlett, Hood or Kieffer for best fruit production

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10. Ayers PearPyrus communis ‘Ayers’

Ayers pear trees can bear fruit in 2-3 years after planting, according to My Perfect Plants.

The Ayers Pear tree (Sugar Pear), with its exceptionally sweet fruit, ideal for desserts, is a desirable addition to any garden.

Its early spring blossoms, a beautiful white with pink overtones, not only enhance the landscape’s aesthetic but also attract pollinators, marking the start of the fruiting season.

This semi-dwarf, deciduous tree matures to bear medium-sized pears with a yellow skin and red blush, ripe for harvest in late July or August.

Adaptable to a range of soil types and resistant to fire blight, the Ayers Pear Tree thrives in USDA zones 5-9, requiring 300-400 chill hours.

While partially self-pollinating, cross-pollination with varieties like Hood Pear, Kieffer Pear, or Orient Pear can boost its fruit yield, making it a splendid choice for both novice and experienced gardeners.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5-9
  • Mature Tree Size: Up to 15-20 feet tall and 10-15 feet wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: 2-3 years*
  • Avg Growth Rate: 1-2 feet per year
  • Chill Hours: 300-400 hours
  • Self Fertile: Partially, benefits from cross-pollination with Hood Pear, Kieffer Pear, or Orient Pear

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11. HoodPyrus communis ‘Hood’

Hood pear trees can bear fruit within 2-3 years of planting, according to Chestnut Tree Farm

The Hood pear tree, a cross between Pyrus communis and Pyrus pyrifolia, thrives in zones 8-10 with a very low chill requirement of just 150 hours, making it an excellent choice for the South.

Its yellow-green pears feature soft flesh with a sweet, Asian pear-like flavor and texture, ideal for fresh consumption, drying, or baking.

The tree is noted for its high disease resistance and ability to bear fruit within 2-3 years of planting, provided it receives proper care.

While it can produce fruit on its own, yields are improved with a pollinator such as the Shinko Asian Pear or Kieffer Pear.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 8-10
  • Mature Tree Size: 20-30 ft tall, 10-20 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: 2-3 years*
  • Avg Growth Rate: 1-2 ft per year
  • Chill Hours: 150
  • Self Fertile: Partial – Pollinates well with the Shinko Asian Pear or Kieffer Pear

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12. ComicePyrus communis ‘Doyenné du Comice’

Comice pear trees can bear fruit within 2-3 years of planting, according to Nature Hills.

The Comice Pear Tree, renowned for its excellent quality and rich fruit, is a connoisseur’s favorite for both fresh eating and culinary use.

It is distinguished by its large, greenish-yellow skin with a rosy-red blush, and its creamy white flesh offers a crisp, sweet, and juicy flavor.

Known for its mid-spring pristine white flowers and vigorous growth, the Comice Pear is an antique variety that requires little pruning and is recommended to be pollinated with Bartlett, Bosc, or D’Anjou pears.

This tree is not only a beautiful ornamental addition to any landscape but also produces a traditional Christmas pear, celebrated for its superior taste and versatility in the kitchen.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5-9
  • Mature Tree Size: 18-25 ft tall, 15-20 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: 2-3 years*
  • Avg Growth Rate: 1-2 ft per year
  • Chill Hours: 500-600
  • Self Fertile: No – Pollinates well with Bartlett, Bosc, or D’Anjou

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13. Orient Pyrus communis ‘Orient’

Orient - Pyrus communis 'Orient' - pear on tree

Orient pear trees can bear fruit within 3-5 years of planting, according to My Perfect Plants.

The Orient Pear tree is a great choice for gardeners seeking a dual-purpose tree that offers both ornamental beauty and abundant fruit production.

This hybrid European pear variety is popular thanks to its large, sweet, juicy pears with creamy white flesh, adorned with a yellow skin that features a red blush.

Renowned for its resistance to fire blight and its adaptability to a variety of soil conditions, the Orient Pear matures its delectable fruit in August and requires cross-pollination to optimize fruit yield.

Its easy care and resilience to pests and diseases make it a rewarding addition to any fruit garden.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5-9
  • Mature Tree Size: 20-30 ft tall, 20-30 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: 3-5 years*
  • Avg Growth Rate: 1-2 ft per year
  • Chill Hours: 400
  • Self Fertile: Yes, but benefits greatly from cross-pollination for larger crops

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14. FlordahomePyrus communis ‘Flordahome’

Flordahome pear trees can bear fruit within 4-7 years of planting, according to My Perfect Plants.

The Flordahome Pear tree, also known as the Florida Pear Tree, is a delightful choice for those in warmer climates, thriving particularly well on the Gulf Coast.

This evergreen tree blooms with tiny white flowers in early spring, leading to greenish-yellow pears that are both tart and sweet, ideal for fresh eating or canning.

With a harvest time in late July to early August, the Flordahome Pear requires minimal chill hours, making it perfect for zones 6-10.

It’s semi-self-fertile, promising better yields with cross-pollination, particularly when paired with the Hood Pear tree for best fruit production.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 6-10
  • Mature Tree Size: 12-15 ft tall, 15-20 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: 4-7 years*
  • Avg Growth Rate: 1-2 ft per year
  • Chill Hours: 150-250
  • Self Fertile: Partial– Pollinates well with the Hood pear tree

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Comparing the Fastest Growing Pear Trees

VarietySpeciesUSDA Growing ZonesMature Tree Size (ft)Time to Bear First Fruit (years)Avg Growth Rate (ft/year)Chill HoursSelf Fertile
Shinseiki AsianPyrus pyrifolia5-912-15 tall and wide1-21-2300-400Yes, enhanced with cross-pollination
Shinko AsianPyrus pyrifolia4-912-15 tall and wide1-21-2400-500Partially, benefits from cross-pollination
BartlettPyrus communis5-912-20 tall and wide1-31-2500-1000Partial, needs pollinator
Beurre BoscPyrus communis4-912-15 tall, 12-18 wide1-31-2300-600No, needs pollinator
KiefferPyrus communis4-915-25 tall, 5-10 wide1-31-2300-500Yes, enhanced with cross-pollination
Beurre D’AnjouPyrus communis5-98-15 tall, 6-10 wide1-31-2500-600No, needs pollinator
HosuiPyrus pyrifolia5-98-10 tall, 6-7 wide1-31-2400-700Yes, enhanced with cross-pollination
PineapplePyrus communis5-920-25 tall, 15-20 wide1-3Strong vertical growth200Yes, but recommended cross-pollination
MoonglowPyrus communis5-98-10 tall, 5-10 wide2-31-2500No, requires a pollinator
AyersPyrus communis5-9Up to 15-20 tall, 10-15 wide2-31-2300-400Partially, benefits from cross-pollination
HoodPyrus communis8-1020-30 tall, 10-20 wide2-31-2150Partial, needs pollinator
ComicePyrus communis5-918-25 tall, 15-20 wide2-31-2500-600No, needs pollinator
OrientPyrus communis5-920-30 tall and wide3-51-2400Yes, benefits from cross-pollination
FlordahomePyrus communis6-1012-15 tall, 15-20 wide4-71-2150-250Partial, benefits from cross-pollination

* Why Pear Tree Growth Rates Differ

We have done our best to provide accurate information about each pear, its growth rate and time to bear fruit.

However, please keep in mind that these are approximations only as actual performance will vary with climate, soil type and care.

Additionally, pear trees can be grown from seeds, through grafting, budding, cuttings, layering, or air layering, with each method offering different advantages.

Grafting and budding allow for the exact replication of desired pear varieties and produce fruit sooner, while growing from seed is more straightforward but takes longer to bear fruit.

For most, purchasing a grafted pear tree from a nursery is the simplest and quickest way to start growing pears.

Many nurseries online and offline use different techniques to grow their pear trees so this means that time to bear first fruit can be very different from one nursery to another.

Why Pear Tree Size Matters

Many nurseries offer multiple pear tree sizes you can purchase.

Generally the smaller the tree, the more affordable they are, while larger trees are more established, likely closer to bearing fruit and therefore more expensive.

If you desire pear production as fast as you possible, consider a grafted or more established tree.

For example Fast Growing Trees has the Kieffer pear tree available in 3 options, 4-5 ft tall, 5-6 ft tall and 6-7 ft tall. If you want pears fast, the 6-7 ft tall tree may be your best option!

Some nurseries offer trees that mature to different sizes too, for example Starkbros, offer Dwarf, Semi Dwarf and Standard, with each option maturing to a different size.

Always check the nursery to see what size tree you are buying to ensure you get the right size for your particular yard and needs.

Chill Hours

Selecting a tree that will thrive in your growing climate requires paying attention to its chill hour requirements, which are critical for successful growth and fruit production.

Pear trees, for instance, must endure several hundred hours of cold temperatures ranging from 35 to 45 degrees Fahrenheit each season to bloom and bear fruit.

Insufficient chill hours can lead to a lack of flowering and foliage.

Why Pollination Matters

Having multiple pear trees can significantly enhance pollination and yield due to cross-pollination, which occurs when pollen from the flowers of one pear tree fertilizes the flowers of another.

Many pear varieties are self-incompatible, meaning they cannot pollinate themselves or even other trees of the same variety, thus requiring the presence of a different compatible variety for pollination.

Cross-pollination not only increases the fruit set but also tends to produce larger and higher quality fruits.

Therefore, planting two or more compatible pear varieties in close proximity can ensure a more reliable and abundant harvest.

Other Fast-Growing & Bearing Fruit Trees

Interested in expanding your home orchard beyond pear trees?

Explore our comprehensive guides on other fast-growing fruit trees that can enrich your garden and your table.

Take a peek at apple, fig, cherry, lemon, pear and peach trees to discover varieties that grow quickly and start bearing fruit in no time.

Happy planting!

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Fern Berg - Founder

Expert Gardener & Horticulturist in Training

Fern has planted and currently cares for over 100 different native and exotic fruit, nut, and ornamental trees. She also cultivates an extensive vegetable garden, several flower gardens and cares for an ever-growing happy family of indoor plants. Fern has a special interest in biodynamic farming, food production and closed loop agriculture. Fern founded Tree Vitalize to help guide others with an interest in tree planting, identification and care.

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