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7 USDA Zone 6 Fruit Trees to Grow for Reliable Harvests


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Gardeners living in the top central region of the US can grow a variety of trees in their gardens.

Unlike their top north and south counterparts, Zone 6 is a blessing for a number of shade, privacy, and flowering trees.

If you’re sure of your USDA planting zone, check out some fantastic Zone 6 fruit trees you can plant in your garden for delicious yearly harvests.

7 Reliable Fruit Trees For USDA Zone 6

1. Fruiting Dwarf Black Mulberry (Morus Nigra)

Fruiting Dwarf Black Mulberry
Image by Mauro Halpern via Flickr

If you love raspberries and blackberries, you’ll fall in love with mulberries’ sweet, woody, and tart flavors. Rich in Vitamin C, B12, and calcium, among other essential vitamins, the Dwarf Black Mulberry produces mulberries that are juicier and more filling than blackberries.

Growing in parts of MD, GA, and PA, this fast-growing tree starts producing fruit in its first year, meaning you don’t have to wait too long to taste the delicious fruit! The Dwarf Black Mulberry thrives in full sun and moist, well-draining soils. Avoid standing water, as that could cause root rot.

After picking your first harvest, you can eat them fresh, add them to pies, preserve them, or juice them up! Mulberries are a tiny powerhouse you’ll absolutely enjoy relishing.

Other Common Names: Red Mulberry, Everbearing Mulberry

Growing Zones: 4-10

Average Size at Maturity: 12-15 ft tall, 8-10 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: This tree flowers in spring. The fruit is ready to harvest in summer.

2. Bing Cherry Tree (Prunus avium ‘Bing’)

Bing Cherry Tree
Image by Rusty Clark via Flickr

If there’s one cherry tree GA, PA, and MD gardeners love to grow, it’s the Bing Cherry. Famous for its delicious, large fruits, Bing cherries boast wine-red flesh, sweet-tart taste, and a tangy aftertaste.

In early spring, the tree adorns its branches with fragrant white flowers that pave the way for tasty cherries you can eat fresh from the branch, add to desserts, or preserve for later!

This Zone 6 tree needs three to five years before it can start producing fruits. When mature, it can produce 50-100 pounds of fruits per season. The Big Cherry thrives in full sun, partial shade, and moist, well-draining soils.

It won’t take kindly to wet soils or frequent standing water as that could cause rot. Since this tree isn’t self-fertile, you’ll need to pair it with other Zone 6 cherry trees to encourage flowers and fruits.

Other Common Names: Sweet Cherry, Mazzard Cherry

Growing Zones: 5-8

Average Size at Maturity: 30-35 ft tall, 20-25 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: This tree flowers in spring. The fruit is ready to harvest in summer.

3. Redhaven Peach Tree (Prunus persica ‘Redhaven’)

A favorite among TX, IL, and GA gardeners, the Redhaven Peach tree produces one of the best varieties of peaches out there. Although its growth rate is moderate, this self-fertile tree can start producing fruit in the first year.

The medium-round fruits have red skin with a light-yellow blush, yellowish-orange flesh, and a sweet and tangy flavor with a tart aftertaste. The sweet-citrusy smelling fruits can be eaten straight, added to pies and cakes, or canned.

The Redhaven Peach thrives in full sun, partial shade, and moist, well-draining soils. A mature tree will bear up to 25 fruits per season, which could weigh differently depending on fruit size. Since they’re semi-dwarf, you can plant more than one tree for a bountiful harvest.

Other Common Names: Red Haven, Dwarf Red Haven

Growing Zones: 5-9

Average Size at Maturity: 12-15 ft tall, 10-12 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: This tree flowers in spring. The fruit is ready to harvest in late summer.

4. Honeycrisp Apple Tree (Malus pumila ‘Honeycrisp’)

Honeycrisp Apple Tree
Image by Rivard via Creative Commons

Bred by the University of Minnesota, Honeycrisp apples have David Bedford to thank for their existence. Growing in most parts of TX, GA, and MD orchards, these trees produce some of the finest and most tasty apples every season.

A combination of pink, red and yellow skin fruits, Honeycrisp apples are juicier than other apple varieties and boast a distinct honey flavor with a sweet pear aftertaste. These drought-tolerant trees are heavy fruit producers and can start fruiting from the first year.

The Honeycrisp Apple thrives in full sun and moist, well-draining soils and, in ideal conditions, can produce 80-150 fruits per season. This tree isn’t self-fertile, so you may have to pair it up with other Zone 6 apple trees to encourage flowering and fruiting.

Other Common Names: Honeycrunch, Minnesota Honey

Growing Zones: 4-9

Average Size at Maturity: 18-25 ft tall, 15-18 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: This tree flowers in spring. The fruit is ready to harvest in late summer.

5. Chicago Hardy Fig Tree (Ficus carica ‘Chicago Hardy’)

Growing in parts of IL, TX, and WA, the Chicago Hardy Fig is a cold-hardy tree that bounces back to life as soon as the temperatures warm up. This is provided you take winter precautions and provide your tree with a degree of safety from the frost.

It would take your fig tree three to four years to start producing fruits, but it can produce close to 43 liters of figs per season when it matures. The deep purple-skinned fruits boast a rich, honey-like flavor with a sugary aftertaste.

You can eat it straight from the branch, use them to garnish your desserts, dry or can them, and they’ll still taste delicious. The Chicago Hardy Fig thrives in full sun and moist, well-draining soils. Since they’re self-fertile, you won’t need to pair them with other Zone 6 fig trees unless you want to multiply harvest.

Other Common Names: Bensonhurst Purple fig, Hardy Chicago

Growing Zones: 5-10

Average Size at Maturity: 10-15 ft tall, 9-12 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: This fig tree flowers in spring. The fruit can be harvested in late summer.

6. Kieffer Pear Tree (Pyrus communis ‘Kieffer’)

For a dwarf variety, Kieffer pears are exceptionally larger than their standard counterparts. Growing in parts of MD, GA, and MA, the Kieffer Pear can start producing fruits in its first year.

In the spring, the tree blooms stunning white flowers that attract bees and butterflies. Kieffer pears are yellow and green-skinned with distinct deep red blush around the center. The ivory-coloured flesh is crisp and firm with a musky and woody aroma. Bite into the pear, and you’ll taste mildly sweet flavors with a tart aftertaste.

The Kieffer Pear is self-fertile and doesn’t need a pollinating partner; however, you can add other Zone 6 pear trees to increase crop quantity. This cold-hardy tree thrives in full sun, shade, and moist, well-draining soils.

Other Common Names: Kieffer

Growing Zones: 4-9

Average Size at Maturity: 10-25 ft tall, 12-15 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: This fig tree flowers in spring. The fruit can be harvested in late summer.

7. Harcot Apricot Tree (Prunus armeniaca ‘Harcot’)

Growing in parts of GA, MD, and MA, the Harcot Apricot is the perfect addition to small and medium-sized gardens. Native to Canada, the tree starts producing fruits after two years but will produce heavily after three to five years.

The Harcot Apricot produces orange and yellow-colored fruits with light red blush. The fruits have velvety skin and juicy bright orange flesh with a sweet taste and a tangy aftertaste.

This semi-dwarf tree thrives in full sun, partial shade, and moist, well-draining soils. The Harcot Apricot is self-fertile, meaning you don’t have to look for a pollinating partner to encourage fruiting. The tree can tolerate some neglect, but frequent standing water can cause root rot.

Other Common Names: Harcot

Growing Zones: 5-9

Average Size at Maturity: 10-25 ft tall, 12-15 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: This fig tree flowers in spring. The fruit can be harvested in late summer.

The Perfect Fruit Tree

In USDA Zone 6, you can grow a wide variety of trees to suit your preferences. From shade trees to evergreen ones and privacy to nut trees, there’s a perfect tree for everyone.

It’s essential to keep your tree’s requirements in mind before planting it to prevent stunted growth or possible damage to your home. Also, check the tree’s flammability rating to keep your home’s defensible space free.

Measure the available space you have in your garden for safe planting. Avoid planting your tree too close to immovable structures, overhead utility lines, underground pipelines, or swimming pools.

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