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16 Stunning USDA Zone 6 Ornamental Flowering Trees


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Ornamental flowering trees add zing to your landscapes and can make a dull area look stunning.

From infusing mystery and romance to adding hints of majesty and drama, there’s a tree for everyone!

Lets take a look at sixteen stunning ornamental flowering trees to add to your zone 6 garden today!

16 USDA Zone 6 Flowering Trees To Plant Today

1. Tulip Poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera)

Currently, the state tree for KY, the Tulip Poplar, stands tall in many parts of TN, IN, and NC. This fast-growing tree is a sight to behold in the fall. In spring, the Tulip Poplar’s branches adorn fragrant gold flowers that create a stunning contrast against the tree’s deep green leaves.

In the fall, the leaves change color, but since it’s gradual, you’ll find yourself staring at a tree boasting mixed shades of green, yellow, and orange leaves.

The Tulip Poplar thrives in full sun, dappled sunlight, and loamy soils. Due to this tree’s height and width at maturity, it’s fit for large gardens with at least 40-60 feet of available space for safe growth.

Other Common Names: Tulip Poplar, Tulip Tree, Yellow Poplar, Yellow-Poplar

Growing Zones: 4-9

Average Size at Maturity: 70-135 ft tall, 30-60 ft wide

2. Yoshino Cherry Tree (Prunus x yedoensis)

Yoshino Cherry Tree
Image by NatureServe via Flickr

If you want to infuse a royal vibe into your garden, you’ll want to plant the Yoshino Cherry Tree. Native to Japan, this tree is a showstopper that’ll be the envy of your neighbors. Adorning gardens around WA, FL, and MD, the Yoshino Cherry was introduced to the USA in 1902 and has continued to rise in popularity.

In the spring, the entire tree decorates itself with beautiful and fragrant pink or white flowers, while the leaves remain deep green until they change color to goldish yellow in the fall. The Yoshino Cherry thrives in full sun, dappled sunlight, and loamy soils with high organic content.

Since this tree doesn’t grow too high at maturity, it makes the perfect focal point for medium and large gardens, with 40 feet of available space for healthy growth.

Other Common Names: Japanese Flowering Cherry, Potomac Cherry, Tokyo Cherry, Yoshino Cherry

Growing Zones: 5-8

Average Size at Maturity: 40-50 ft tall, 25-40 ft wide

3. Eastern Redbud (Cercis canadensis)

If you’re looking to paint your landscape pink, the Eastern Redbud is right up your alley. Decorating landscapes around NJ, PA, and NC, the Eastern Redbud is a sight to behold in the spring.

Native to the USA, in the spring, the tree decorates itself with pink, lavender, or burgundy flowers that create a beautiful contrast against its deep green foliage. In the fall, the leaves take the limelight as they transform from green to gold, infusing a majestic vibe to the overall landscape.

The Eastern Redbud thrives in full sun, dappled sunlight, and loamy soils with high organic content. This short-lived tree makes a great ornamental tree for small, medium, and large gardens, with at least 20 feet of available space for safe growth.

Other Common Names: American Judas Tree, American Redbud, Eastern Redbud, Judas Tree, Mexican Redbud, Redbud, Texas Redbud

Growing Zones: 4-9

Average Size at Maturity: 20-30 ft tall, 15-30 ft wide

4. Saucer Magnolia (Magnolia x soulangeana)

Saucer Magnolia Flowering
Image by Tatters ✾ via Flickr

If you want your garden to look like it’s a work of art, you can’t go wrong with the magic that Saucer Magnolia brings along. With flowers that look like rare butterflies, the Saucer Magnolia can be seen beautifying landscapes and gardens in GA and MD.

Native to Japan, the Saucer Magnolia is a sight to behold in spring when it decorates its branches with fragrant pink, lavender, or white flowers. A hybrid between Magnolia liliiflora and Magnolia denudate, this drought-tolerant tree thrives in full sun, dappled sunlight, and soils rich with organic content.

In the fall, the tree’s leaves change color, going from typical green to glorious copper and gold. Since this tree isn’t very tall at maturity, it’s a perfect choice for small, medium, and large gardens with at least 20 feet of available space.

Other Common Names: Saucer Magnolia, Tulip Magnolia, Chinese Magnolia

Growing Zones: 4-9

Average Size at Maturity: 15-35 ft tall, 15-25 ft wide

5. Prairifire Crabapple (Malus x ‘Prairifire’)

If you want to attract beneficial birds and pollinators to pollinate your other plants, the Prairifire Crabapple should be top on your list. Introduced to the USA in 1982 by Dr. Daniel Dayton, this glamorous tree takes your landscape to a whole new level in the spring.

Standing pretty in parts of MD and OR, the stunning tree makes an excellent focal point. In the spring, the tree’s branches are covered with fragrant wine-red flowers that pave the way for deep red fruits in the fall. These fruits attract birds, while the flowers encourage beneficial pollinators to work their magic in your garden.

The Prairifire Crabapple thrives in full sun and moist, well-draining soils. This tree stands less than 30 feet tall at maturity, making it the perfect accent tree for small, medium, and large gardens.

Other Common Names: Flowering Crabapple, Prairiefire Crabapple

Growing Zones: 4-8

Average Size at Maturity: 15-20 ft tall, 15-20 ft wide

6. Purple Robe Locust Tree (Robinia pseudoacacia ‘Purple Robe’)

Purple Robe Locust Tree flowering
Image by Wendy Cutler via Flickr

If you’re looking for ornamental flowering trees that work as Zone 6 shade trees, you’ll fall in love with the Purple Robe Locust. Standing high in parts of TX, MD, and WA, this tree is easy to grow and is worth paying attention to!

In the spring, the tree decorates itself with fragrant deep pink flowers that create a stunning contrast against its bluish-green leaves. In the fall, the tree’s leaves turn yellow, signifying a change of seasons. Native to central North America, the Purple Robe Locust thrives in full sun, dappled sunlight, and moist, well-draining soils.

Since the tree stands somewhat tall at maturity, it makes a great addition to medium and large gardens with at least 40 feet of available space for safe growth.

Other Common Names: Purple Robe, Black Locust

Growing Zones: 4-8

Average Size at Maturity: 30-40 ft tall, 20-30 ft wide

7. Kwanzan Cherry Tree (Prunus serrulata ‘Kwanzan’)

Kwanzan Cherry Tree
Image by F.D. Richards via Flickr

Looking for the most ornamental of all cherry trees? If you’ve ever had the pleasure of being around the Kwanzan Cherry Tree, you know nothing can beat its majesty, style, and charisma. Native to Japan, Korea, and China, the tree is famous for its beautiful flowers that are often used in many festivals.

There’s a reason cherry blossoms are Japan’s national flower because they symbolize life, health, and happiness! That said, the Kwanzan is short-lived, and even in ideal conditions, it lives for up to 25 years. Standing pretty in parts of WA and FL, the tree thrives in full sun, dappled sunlight, and well-draining loamy soils.

Although the tree doesn’t grow too tall at maturity, it has a wide branch system, which makes it ideal for medium and large gardens with at least 25 feet of available space for healthy growth.

Other Common Names: Japanese Flowering Cherry, Japanese Cherry, Oriental Cherry

Growing Zones: 5-9

Average Size at Maturity: 25-35 ft tall, 25-35 ft wide

8. Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis)

There’s nothing wrong with wanting to be the owner of the best garden on the block! The Chinese Wisteria is one of those trees that can truly transform your landscape, taking it from drab to fab in a matter of months!

Decorating landscapes around MD, GA, and PA, the Chinese Wisteria is a sight to behold in spring when its branches adorn fragrant flowers that come in many shades. From lavender to white and blue to pink, you can pick the shade that appeals to you most and one that fits right in with your garden theme.

The Chinese Wisteria thrives in full sun, dappled sunlight, and well-draining loamy soils. Since the tree doesn’t grow too tall at maturity, they make the perfect zone 6 tree for small, medium, and large gardens with at least 15 feet of available space to plant.

Other Common Names: Chinese Wisteria, Fabables, Vilmorin, Wisteria

Growing Zones: 5-8

Average Size at Maturity: 15-25 ft tall, 10-30 ft wide

9. White Flowering Dogwood (Cornus florida)

White Flowering Dogwood
Image by Ryan Somma via Flickr

If white flowers and deep green leaves appeal to you, you can’t go wrong with picking the White Flowering Dogwood for your garden. Electrifying landscapes around GA, FL, and NC, the tree is a sight to behold in spring.

Native to Canada, Mexico, and North America, the White Flowering Dogwood is NC’s state flower and is currently considered endangered because it is highly susceptible to a deadly fungus that kills the tree upon impact. In spring, the branches adorn themselves with beautiful flowers that come in many shades.

From gold and green to white and pink, there’s a perfect type of dogwood tree for everyone. In the fall, these flowers pave the way for small berries that attract birds to your garden while the tree’s deep green foliage turns a rich shade of plum red. The White Flowering Dogwood thrives in full sun, dappled sunlight, and loamy soils.

Other Common Names: Flowering Dogwood, Eastern Flowering Dogwood

Growing Zones: 5-9

Average Size at Maturity: 15-30 ft tall, 20-25 ft wide

10. Pink Velour Crape Myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica ‘Whit III’)

Standing somewhat tall in gardens of TX and GA, the Pink Velour Crape Myrtle is an all-rounder with stunning flowers and foliage year-round. Native to eastern Asia, the Pink Velour Crape Myrtle is a sight to behold in the summer and fall.

In the summer, panicles of beautiful magenta flowers decorate the branches, creating a sharp contrast against the tree’s glossy green foliage. In the fall, the tree’s leaves change color, bringing forth a unique shade of gold, burgundy, and orange.

This drought-tolerate tree thrives in full sun and moist, well-draining soils. Since this tree doesn’t grow too tall at maturity, it’s a great choice for small, medium, and large gardens with at least 20 feet of available space to plant it.

Other Common Names: Crapemyrtle, Crape Myrtle, Crepe Myrtle, Lilac of the South

Growing Zones: 6-9

Average Size at Maturity: 8-12 ft tall, 8-12 ft wide

11. Mimosa Tree (Albizia julibrissin ‘Rosea’)

Mimosa tree flowering
Image by Andreas Rockstein via Flickr

Standing pretty in eastern TX, Mimosa infuses a tropical vibe to any landscape it’s planted. Native to Asia, the Mimosa boasts fern-like green leaves that create a stunning contrast against its puffy hot pink flowers.

In the spring and summer, the tree boasts cloud-like fragrant flowers that can be seen from blocks away. Thanks to their long blooming seasons, the flowers attract beneficial pollinators to your garden while looking pretty throughout summer!

This evergreen tree’s leaves remain green year-round. Mimosa thrives in full sun, dappled sunlight, and loamy soils. Since these trees can grow pretty tall, they’re suited for medium and large gardens that have at least 30 feet of available space for safe growth.

Other Common Names: Mimosa, Persian Silk Tree, Pink Silk Tree, Bastard Tamarind, Silk Tree

Growing Zones: 6-9

Average Size at Maturity: 20-40 ft tall, 20-50 ft wide

12. Corinthian White Double Flowering Peach Tree (Prunus persica ‘Corinthian White’)

Corinthian White Double Flowering Peach Tree
Image by David J. Stang via Wikimedia Commons

If you’d rather plant a tree with heavy blooms, you can’t go wrong with the Corinthian White Double Flowering Peach Tree! Popular for its double-petal fragrant blooms that come in white or pink, the Corinthian White Double Flowering Peach is a sight to behold in spring.

This tree’s blooms attract beneficial pollinators to your garden and birds and butterflies. In spring, the branches bloom with double-petal flowers with bright yellow pistils that create a stunning contrast against the tree’s deep green foliage.

In fall, the tree’s foliage turns sunset yellow, illuminating the landscape it’s planted on! Corinthian White Double Flowering Peach thrives in full sun and moist, well-draining soils. However, it won’t take kindly to wet feet that can quickly cause root rot.

Other Common Names: Corinthian White Peach Tree

Growing Zones: 5-9

Average Size at Maturity: 20-25 ft tall, 10-15 ft wide

13. Newport Flowering Plum Tree (Prunus cerasifera ‘Newport’)

Newport Flowering Plum
Image by Lauren Anstey via Flickr

Looking for trees that bloom like cherry blossoms? The Newport Flowering Plum is an excellent choice for landscapes as they’re cold-hardy and make great privacy trees. The Newport Flowering Plum is famous for its ornamental beauty rather than its edible fruits!

Standing pretty in parts of TX, this tree is a showstopper in spring thanks to its fragrant pale pink and white flowers with bright pink centers and yellow pistils. These beautiful flowers create a stunning contrast against the tree’s glossy lavender-burgundy leaves.

The Newport Flowering Plum thrives in full sun, dappled sunlight, and moist, well-draining loamy soils. Since this tree isn’t very tall at maturity, it makes a great specimen tree for small, medium, and large gardens with at least 20 feet of available space.

Other Common Names: Newport Plum, Newport Cherry Plum

Growing Zones: 4-8

Average Size at Maturity: 15-20 ft tall, 15-20 ft wide

14. Cherokee Chief Dogwood (Cornus florida ‘Cherokee Chief’)

Standing somewhat tall in parts of MD, MA, and PA, the Cherokee Chief Dogwood makes an excellent accent tree for small, medium, and large gardens. Native to Canada, east America, and Mexico, the tree thrives in full sun, dappled sunlight, and loamy soils with high organic content.

In the spring, the tree blooms with showy white, pink, and gold flowers, creating a stunning contrast against its ovate leaves that turn a shade of deep purple and red in the fall. They make great specimen trees for patios and can be used around borders and for mass planting.

It produces edible red-colored fruit that attracts birds, while the flowers act as magnets for beneficial pollinators. You’ll need at least 20 feet of available space to plant this beauty in your garden.

Other Common Names: Flowering Dogwood

Growing Zones: 5-9

Average Size at Maturity: 15-25 ft tall, 15-30 ft wide

15. Autumn Blooming Cherry (Prunus subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’)

Autumn Blooming Cherry
Image by Arlington National Cemetery via Flickr

If your idea of the perfect tree is one that resembles a Weeping Willow, the Autumn Blooming Cherry is right up your alley. Standing pretty in parts of MD, GA, and PA, the Autumn Blooming Cherry is a sight to behold in the spring and fall.

In the spring, the tree decorates its branches with double pink flowers and does it a second time, albeit sparsely, in the fall. This heavy bloomer’s leaves turn gold in the fall, creating a jaw-dropping contrast against the fragrant pink blooms. This tree’s flowers are often used in decorations and celebrations.

Native to Japan, the Autumn Blooming Cherry thrives in full sun, partial shade, and moist, well-draining soils. That said, this tree is short-lived and, in ideal conditions, it can live up to 25 years.

Other Common Names: Weeping Higan Cherry, Higan Cherry, Rosebud Cherry, Spring Cherry

Growing Zones: 5-8

Average Size at Maturity: 15-25 ft tall, 15-25 ft wide

16. Bradford Flowering Pear Tree (Pyrus calleryana ‘Bradford’)

Bradford Flowering Pear Tree
Image by geraldbrazell via Flickr

Native to China, Japan, and Korea, the Bradford Flowering Pear came to the USA sometime in the mid-60s. Decorating landscapes around MD, NY, and PA, the Bradford Flowering Pear is a sight to behold in spring.

The Bradford Flowering Pear thrives in full sun, partial shade, and well-draining soils. In the spring, the tree’s branches adorn themselves with clusters of pretty white or cream flowers with orange centers and yellow pistils. This tree is short-lived, and even in ideal conditions, it will live up to 25 years.

In the fall, the tree’s deep green foliage turns a mix of red, orange, gold, and burgundy. The Bradford Flowering Pear makes a great shade tree for medium and large gardens, with at least 40 feet of available space for healthy growth.

Other Common Names: Bradford Pear, Callery ‘Bradford’ Pear, Callery Pear

Growing Zones: 5-9

Average Size at Maturity: 30-50 ft tall, 20-35 ft wide

A Tree For All!

Ornamental flowering trees are perfect ways to add personality, style, and charm to an otherwise plain garden. However, if you have more garden space and would like to experiment with other types of trees, there are a few other Zone 6 trees you can grow today.

If you’d rather have something edible every season and you have large gardens, you could try planting delicious fig trees or crunchy nut trees that are suitable for USDA Zone 6.

Regardless of the kind of tree you plant, check your USDA planting zone and made sure you have enough space for safe growth. Don’t plant your tree too close to your property, overhead lines, or underground pipes.

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