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30 Types of Florida Palm Trees (Includes Native & Small)


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With plenty of rain and abundant sunshine every year, Florida is famous for its palm trees!

From beaches to landscapes and private gardens, Florida’s palms are a great way to transform concrete jungles into tropical getaways!

Florida’s Planting zones include hot and humid summers with frequent thunderstorms and tolerable winters with occasional bursts of cold weather.

Take a look at thirty of the best palm trees you can grow in Florida to adorn your landscape and gardens.

Contents show

30 Stunning Florida Palm Trees to Plant Today

1. Areca Palm Tree (Dypsis lutescens)

If you’re looking for small trees for Florida, you can’t go wrong with the mighty Areca Palm. Adorning gardens and landscapes in different parts of Florida, Areca Palm is a sight to behold in all its glory.

Its multiple stems branch out from a single base and arch upward, but the weight of the feathery green fronds bend the tips, making it look like nature’s butterfly. Also known as the Butterfly Palm, these plants diffuse large amounts of humidity into the air. According to scientist B. C. Wolverton, a six-foot Areca palm dispenses one liter of water every 24 hours!

Humidity helps prevent the spread of numerous airborne diseases and is particularly helpful for people with respiratory illnesses. Areca palms tolerate low-light conditions and can even be potted as indoor plants.

They prefer full sun, dappled light, and partial shade. They grow well in moist, well-draining soils, and little fertilization as an overdose can cause yellowing leaves, fungus, and mold.

Other Common Names: Areca Palm, Bamboo Palm, Butterfly Palm, Cane Palm, Golden Butterfly Palm, Golden Feather Palm, Yellow Palm

Growing Zones: 10-11

Average Size at Maturity: 4-5 ft tall indoors and 15-30 ft tall outdoors, 3-5 ft wide indoors and 5-15 ft wide outdoors

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers appear in summer

Available at: Fast-Growing-Trees & Nature Hills

2. Coconut Palm Tree (Cocos nucifera’ Green Malayan’)

Coconut Palm
Image by Katja Schulz via Flickr

If you’re looking for a tree with moderate growth, the Coconut Palm Tree will surprise you! It isn’t a fast grower, which means you won’t have to worry about brittle wood or shallow roots. Moreover, most of the time, fast-growing trees don’t last long and attract various diseases.

This tree’s large, thirst-quenching coconuts with sweet, creamy flesh makes it unique. The tree tolerates some neglect, but standing water and deep shade can quickly invite root rot.

The coconut tree prefers full sun and partial shade and thrives in moist, well-draining soils. During winters, you can either protect the tree by wrapping them with heat tape or, if you’re growing them in containers, bring them indoors to help them brave the cold.

As soon as your tree is between five and six years old, it’ll start producing fruit, but don’t plant it too close to immovable structures, high-traffic areas, or a kids’ play area, as fruit can fall when ripe.

Other Common Names: ‘Malayan Dwarf’ Coconut Palm

Growing Zones: 10-11 (When planted outdoors)

Average Size at Maturity: 5-10 ft tall indoors and 20-40 ft tall outdoors, 5-10 ft wide indoors and 10-15 ft wide outdoors

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring, and fruits appear in summer

Available at: Fast-Growing-Trees

3. Bottle Palm Tree (Hyophorbe lagenicaulis)

If you’re looking for a palm tree that makes a bold statement, Bottle Palm is right up your alley. It looks like a bottle with a fountain of life!

The tree’s growth rate is slow, so it can attain its bottle-like figure and establish itself in your property. Unlike other palm trees, this tree believes in minimalism and won’t bear many fronds.

The benefits of a tree will a small number of fronds is that it makes the place look uncluttered, doesn’t compete for space, and won’t make pruning difficult. The Bottle Palm is great for busy landscapes and raised and container gardens.

The tree thrives in full sun and partial shade and prefers moist, well-draining soils to thrive. Bottle Palm produces beautiful white flowers that turn into tiny round edible fruits.

Fruit harvest will depend on the number of Bottle Palm trees you have in your garden. The fruits combine sweet and tart flavors, similar to coconuts.

Other Common Names: Palmiste Gargoulette, Bottle Palm

Growing Zones: 10-11 (When planted outdoors)

Average Size at Maturity: 5-7 ft tall indoors and 10-20 ft tall outdoors, 6-8 ft wide indoors and 10-15 ft wide outdoors

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring, and fruits appear in summer

Available at: Fast-Growing-Trees

4. Pygmy Date Palm (Phoenix roebelenii) – Non-Native Tree

Looking for a palm tree that fits in tight spaces and still looks like a traditional palm tree? The Pygmy Date Palm should fit the bill. Many gardeners plant this tree to highlight swimming pools, gazebos, and patios, but they can be planted anywhere in your landscape.

The Pygmy Date Palm bears beautiful cream flowers that pave the way for copper, lavender, and burgundy fruits that aren’t overly sweet or fleshy. The tree has many fronds, meaning it’ll need a lot of space to show off those deep green leaves. That said, standing water and deep shade can cause fungal problems.

The Pygmy Date Palm prefers full sun and partial shade and thrives in moist, well-draining soil. Since it likes to be slightly rootbound, it won’t take kindly to frequent repotting.

With a slow growth rate, you won’t have to worry about brittle trunks or falling fruits. And, in ideal conditions, your Pygmy Date Palm can live between 25-50 years.

Other Common Names: Dwarf Date Palm, Miniature Date Palm, Pygmy Date Palm, Robellini Palm, Roebelin Palm

Growing Zones: 10-11 (When planted outdoors)

Average Size at Maturity: 6-7 ft tall indoors and 7-12 ft tall outdoors, 3-5 ft wide indoors and 3-5 ft wide outdoors

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring, and fruits appear in summer

Available at: Fast-Growing-Trees

5. Bismarck Palm (Bismarckia nobilis) – Non-Native Tree

Bismarck Palm (Bismarckia Nobilis) - Small and Large Tree
Image by Fern Berg (Own Work) for Tree Vitalize

The Bismarck Palm is a large tree that prefers growing in open grassland. Native to Madagascar, this tree isn’t for small gardens due to its massive height and width. Named after the first German chancellor, Otto von Bismarck, the tree won’t take kindly to frequent transplanting due to its thick taproots.

Trees with thick taproots shouldn’t be planted too close to immovable structures. So, before bringing this tree home, overhead pipelines, underground pipes, swimming pools, and other high-traffic areas like pavements and driveways should be considered.

The Bismarck Palm prefers full sun and loamy soils to thrive. Boasting bluish-green leaves, the tree is cold hardy to 20 degrees Fahrenheit and will recover quickly if provided with ideal growing conditions.

These trees are drought-tolerant and won’t mind an occasional mix-up in watering schedules, but too much water can cause rot and mold.

The Bismarck Palm makes an excellent accent tree, but it comes with a condition – it needs large spaces to thrive.

Other Common Names: Bismark Palm, Satra, Satrabe

Growing Zones: 10-11

Average Size at Maturity: 40 – 70 ft tall, 15-20 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring, and fruits appear in summer

Available at: Fast-Growing-Trees

6. Mexican Fan Palm (Washington robusta) – Non-Native Tree

Mexican Fan Palm Lyrae Willis
Image by Lyrae Willis for Tree Vitalize

Looking for a towering palm tree to add to your landscape? The Mexican Fan Palm has you covered! It’s a fast-growing tree that grows to incredible heights of 50 feet within 10 years. In ideal growing conditions, this tree grows three feet a year, giving you something to look forward to!

Thankfully, the tree produces small black fruits that are less than an inch in size, so you won’t have to worry about large fruits raining from your palm tree! That said, the tree needs large landscapes to grow due to its height and can be a concern during pruning in tight residential areas.

Native to Mexico, you’ll need at least 50 to 60 feet of available space for safe planting. The Mexican Fan Palm thrives in full sun and prefers loamy-silt soils for healthy growth.

It produces panicles of gold or white fragrant flowers that pave the way for tart fruits that many don’t like to eat. While the tree tolerates poor soil, standing water can quickly lead to its demise.

Other Common Names: Mexican Fan Palm

Growing Zones: 9-11

Average Size at Maturity: 50 – 100 ft tall, 10-15 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring, and fruits appear in summer

Available at: Fast-Growing-Trees

7. Sabal Palmetto (Sabal palmetto)

Cabbage Palm or Sabal Palmetto
Image by Forest and Kim Starr via Flickr

Native to Florida, the Sabal Palmetto gets its name from its edible leaves, which taste a bit like cabbage! Besides being South Carolina’s official state tree since 1939, the Sabal Palmetto also finds its image etched on South Carolina’s state flag, great seal, and the state’s quarter coin.

The Sabal Palmetto’s trunk and foliage are salt-tolerant, but its roots will wilt if exposed to high amounts of salt. So if you’re using salt to melt ice, you’ll have to shovel around the tree instead of exposing it to salt. The tree prefers full sun, thrives in moist, well-draining soils, and tolerates occasional standing water.

The Sabal Palmetto blooms in summer thanks to its gold and white fragrant flowers, which pave the way for blackish-blue fruits akin to berries. These fruits are mostly sweet with a bitter aftertaste. While they’re edible for humans, they’re mostly part of a diet for small mammals and birds.

Other Common Names: Cabbage Palm, Cabbage Palmetto, Carolina Palmetto, Blue Palmetto, Swamp Cabbage

Growing Zones: 7-11

Average Size at Maturity: 40 – 50 ft tall, 10-15 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in summer and fruits harvested in fall

8. Canary Island Date Palm (Phoenix canariensis) – Non-Native Tree

Canary Island Date Palm (Phoenix canariensis) Tree and Fronds
Image by Fern Berg (Own Work) for Tree Vitalize

If there’s one tree that luxury resorts and hotels prefer to grow in their landscapes, it’s the Canary Island Date Palm.

Known for its beauty and pineapple-like appearance, the tree is a favorite among many gardeners for many reasons. Not only does it grow slowly (reaching 10 feet in 15 years), it boasts a full crown with over 140 leaves, each with 200 V-shaped leaflets.

The tree produces clusters of orange flowers that soon transform into round orangish-brown to deep purple fruits that measure less than an inch in size. The fruits are edible but have an unpleasant taste akin to raw dates.

The Canary Island Date Palm prefers full sun and thrives in moist, well-draining soils. While it tolerates drought to an extent, it would appreciate an extra drink of water during hotter months.

While the tree can be containerized, frequent repotting can damage its root ball, leading to its early demise. Did you know that this tree can live up to 300 years in ideal conditions?!

Other Common Names: Canary Date Palm, Canary Island Date Palm, Pineapple Palm

Growing Zones: 9-11

Average Size at Maturity: 30 – 60 ft tall, 20-30 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring, and fruits appear in summer

Available at: Fast-Growing-Trees

9. Chinese Fan Palm (Livistona chinensis) – Non-Native Tree

Chinese Fan Palm
Image by Joegoauk Goa via Flickr

Native to southern Japan, Taiwan, and China, the Chinese Fan Palm symbolizes peace, victory, and persistence – three invaluable values you want to harvest in your landscapes!

While it usually reaches 30 feet in height, it can grow up to 50 feet tall in ideal conditions! The tree boasts 6-feet long fan-shaped leaves that droop mid-way, creating a fountain-like look.

The Chinese Fan Palm bears creamy-white flowers followed by black fruits that are consumed mainly by birds and small mammals. The fruits are chewy and somewhat sweet, with a slightly bitter aftertaste.

In ideal conditions, the tree can live up to 40 years! It prefers full sun and thrives in moist, well-draining soils. Although the tree is cold-hardy and can tolerate temperatures as low as 15 degrees Fahrenheit, its leaves may be severely damaged by frost.

That said, before you bring home this tree, check with your local laws to ensure it’s not listed as invasive species in your region. Since they germinate easily and can sprout like wild mushrooms, some states have listed them as an invasive species.

Other Common Names: Chinese Palm, Fountain Palm

Growing Zones: 9-11

Average Size at Maturity: 20 – 50 ft tall, 10 – 15 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring, and fruits appear in early spring through fall

10. Dwarf Palmetto (Sabal minor)

Dwarf Palmetto
Image by Drew Avery via Flickr

Looking for a palm variety that doesn’t threaten overhead utility lines, underground pipes, and immovable structures?

The Dwarf Palmetto is right up your alley! Measuring up to six feet tall and five feet wide, this tree is suitable for small, medium, and large gardens. One of the hardiest palms, it can live as a shrub for over 10 years, provided it’s growing in ideal conditions.

The tree produces fragrant creamy-white or blue flowers that transform into showy black or green half-inch fruits. The fruits, which are part of a small mammal or a bird’s diet, can be consumed by humans, but only in moderate quantities. The fruit tastes sweet with a somewhat bland aftertaste.

The Dwarf Palmetto is cold hardy, and can tolerate temperatures as low as 10 degrees Fahrenheit. However, it prefers full sun and moist, loamy soils with high organic content to thrive. It tolerates occasional neglect, but frequent standing water can damage foliage and cause rot.

Other Common Names: Dwarf Palmetto, Swamp Palmetto, Bush Palmetto, Scrub Palmetto, Bluestem Palmetto

Growing Zones: 7-10

Average Size at Maturity: 4-6 ft tall, 3-5 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring, and fruits appear in early spring through fall

11. European Fan Palm (Chamaerops humilis) – Non-Native Tree

European Fan Palm
Image by Torquay Palms via Flickr

The European Fan Palm gets down to business when you plant it in your landscape! Besides being bushy thanks to its structure, the tree’s slow growth rate means you’ll share a good amount of time watching it transform your garden.

How about containerizing the palm if you’re looking for ways to add life to your decks and pergolas? The European Fan Palm won’t mind growing in containers if you provide ample space to boast its foliage.

The tree decorates its branches in spring with tiny gold flowers, transforming into orangish-copper, green, or reddish-burgundy sweet fruits with a mild sour aftertaste.

Your European Fan Palm would live up to 30 years in ideal conditions. To thrive, the tree prefers full sun and moist, well-draining soil with high organic matter.

Other Common Names: European Fan Palm, Mediterranean Fan Palm

Growing Zones: 7-11

Average Size at Maturity: 10-15 ft tall, 6-8 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring, and fruits appear in early spring through fall

Available at: Fast-Growing-Trees & Nature Hills

12. Fishtail Palm (Caryota mitis) – Non-Native Tree

Fishtail Palm (Caryota mitis) Tree, Leaves and Early Flowers
Images by Fern Berg, (Own Work), for Tree Vitalize

Native to South East Asia, the Fishtail Palm is an ornamental palm tree that looks nothing like a traditional palm tree! Instead of spiky V-shaped leaflets, the Fishtail Palm’s leaves resemble fishtail fins and are more irregular with feathery edges.

The tree can be containerized; however, it can grow up to 40 feet tall in ideal conditions! With a moderate growth rate, the Fishtail Palm is drought tolerant and can tolerate temperatures as long as 15 degrees Fahrenheit. That said, it prefers full sun and moist, well-draining soils to thrive.

The Fishtail Palm produces lavender flowers in the summer, which are replaced by greenish-black non-edible berry-type fruits. The fruit’s flesh is poisonous and can cause nausea and inflammation, while the seed inside the flesh is edible, often a replacement for betel nuts.

If you’re growing this tree, ensure to keep kids and pets away from fallen fruits to avoid accidents.

Other Common Names: Burmese Fishtail Palm, Clustering Fishtail Palm, Fishtail Palm

Growing Zones: 9-10

Average Size at Maturity: 20-25 ft tall, 10-15 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in summer

Available at: Fast-Growing-Trees

13. Florida Royal Palm (Roystonea regia)

Royal Palm
Image by Lisa Jacobs via Flickr

Looking for the stuff of royalty? Well, how about Florida’s native palm, the Florida Royal Palm? Adorning gardens around coastal regions, the tree is a show-stopper and can quickly transform your landscape into a tropical gateway. The tree is suitable for roadsides, pools, parks, and driveways thanks to its ornamental foliage.

That said, planting palm trees away from immovable structures, overhead and underground lines is always recommended. Their towering height can make pruning a monumental task if it’s too close to structures.

The tree drops old, dying leaves as part of the self-cleaning process, which can damage properties and people. This is because some leaves are between 10 and 15 feet long and weigh up to 50 pounds! The tree produces small cream-colored flowers that transform into greenish-purple fruits that attract birds, small mammals, and bats.

The tree prefers full sun and thrives in moist, well-draining soils. It is somewhat drought-tolerant but will appreciate an extra drink of water during hotter months.

Other Common Names: Royal Palm, Florida Royal Palm, Cuban Royal Palm

Growing Zones: 10-11

Average Size at Maturity: 50-70 ft tall, 20-25 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring, and fruits appear in summer

14. Florida Silver Palm (Coccothrinax argentata)

Florida Silver Palm
Image by James St. John via Flickr

Native to south Florida, the Florida Silver Palm is a slender evergreen palm that looks similar to European Fan Palms; only this one can grow tall!

As an accent tree, you’ll see this tree standing about 10 feet tall in luxury resorts and wealthy neighborhoods. Its almost teal-colored fan-shaped leaves are a sight to behold on dewy and breezy mornings!

They’re a great way to transform your outdoor space into a dreamy getaway, and thankfully you won’t need to worry about heavy fruit falling from the tree. In early summer, the Florida Silver Palm adorns its branches with small white flowers, which then transform into edible berry-like deep purple fruits by late summer.

The fruits are a main part of a bird’s diet and aren’t overly sweet. In fact, some have an unpleasant taste with a somewhat mild bitter aftertaste.

The rubbery outer texture of the fruit can leave a dry feeling in your mouth, akin to extremely raw dates. The tree thrives in full sun and prefers moist, well-draining soils for healthy growth.

Other Common Names: Silver Thatch Palm, Silver Palm, Biscayne Palm, and Silvertop

Growing Zones: 10-11

Average Size at Maturity: 10-20 ft tall, 5-6 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in early summer, and fruits appear in late summer

15. Florida Thatch Palm (Thrinax radiata)

Florida Thatch Palm
Image by Forest and Kim Starr via Flickr

Here’s another slow-growing palm tree to add to your landscape! Many landscape artists grow the Florida Thatch Palm for its broad leaf structure that acts as a canopy. Some trees can be grouped to create a large canopy, while others can be placed a safe distance apart to create a privacy screen.

Either way, the Florida Thatch Palm won’t disappoint. The tree flowers year-round, but the blooms peak in spring, paving the way for green berry-like fruits that turn white as they ripen. The Florida Thatch Palm starts flowering as soon as it’s six feet tall, which means you won’t have to wait too long to see it bloom.

The tree prefers full sun and dappled shade and thrives in moist, well-draining soils. The tree can be containerized to be used as an indoor accent tree, too! Finally, this tree gains six inches of height every year, so plan the space accordingly!

Other Common Names: Jamaican Thatch, Jamaica Thatch Palm, Caribbean Thatch Palm, Sea Thatch Palm, Silk-Top Thatch Palm, Broad Thatch Palm

Growing Zones: 10-11

Average Size at Maturity: 20-25 ft tall, 5-6 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in early summer, and fruits appear in late summer

16. Foxtail Palm (Wodyetia bifurcata) – Non-Native Tree

Foxtail Palm
Image by Forest and Kim Starr via Flickr

Known for its perfect proportions, bushy appearance, rounded fronds, and self-cleaning habit, the Foxtail Palm is a tropical show-stopper! If trained properly, your tree can spring from single or multiple trunks to suit your landscape.

The Foxtail Palm boasts an ash-grey trunk topped with a light yellowish-green crown, home to deep blue-green fronds that make the tree look fuller.

Although the Foxtail Palm can transform landscapes of any size, it needs enough room to spread its fronds. The tree produces cream flowers that transform into tiny round fruits which attract birds and small mammals.

While the fruits are edible, they’re overly acrid and unpleasant to eat! The Foxtail Palm is a fast grower, and due to its self-cleaning habit, ensure to plant it away from immovable structures and overhead utility lines.

The tree prefers full sun and thrives in moist, well-draining soils. Although they’re moderately drought-tolerant, they’ll appreciate an extra drink of water during hot months.

Other Common Names: Wodyetia Palm

Growing Zones: 10-11

Average Size at Maturity: 8-30 ft tall, 15-20 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in early summer, and fruits appear in late summer

17. Pindo Palm (Butia capitata) – Non-Native Tree

If you’re looking for a slow-growing tree that’ll allow you to marvel at its beauty, you can’t go wrong with the Pindo Palm.

Standing pretty in posh landscapes and resorts, the Pindo Palm is a sight to behold year-round. Native to Brazil, the tree is famous for its bright orange fruit that throngs from its branches in the summer.

The fruits are gold, orange, or burgundy, but they’re sweet, tart, and juicy regardless of color. The aftertaste is somewhat that of pineapples, and they’re used in jams, jellies, and wines. If you’re looking for small trees for Florida landscapes, the Pindo Palm won’t disappoint.

Its inward-curling pale green fronds give this tropical beauty a distinctive look. In spring, the tree’s crown decorates itself with fragrant gold, orange, or burgundy flowers, paving the way for bite-size fruits. The Pindo Palm prefers full sun and thrives in moist, well-draining soils with high organic content.

Other Common Names: Brazilian Butia Palm, Jelly Palm, Pindo Palm, South American Jelly Palm, Yatay Palm, Wine Palm

Growing Zones: 8-10

Average Size at Maturity: 15-20 ft tall, 10-15 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring, and fruits appear in late summer

Available at: Fast-Growing-Trees & Nature Hills

18. King Palm (Archontophoenix cunninghamiana) – Non-Native Tree

Alexander Palm, King Palm tree (Archontophoenix alexandrae)
Image by Fern Berg (Own Work) for Tree Vitalize

If you’d rather have the king of kings, King Palm is right up your alley. It’s one of the most popular palm trees for Florida landscapes. A single tree may look odd due to its single-ringed trunk, but a group of King Palms can truly transform your backyard into a dreamy getaway!

King Palm is home to 15 to 20 arching fronds, each with about 150 leaflets between six to 12 inches long. In mid-summer, the tree decorates its crown with bright pink flowers, followed by green berry-like fruits that turn red when ripe. The fruits hang in clusters and often attract birds and small mammals.

Although the fruits are edible, they have an unpleasant taste with a bitter aftertaste. King Palm prefers full sun and thrives in moist, well-draining soils. The tree won’t take kindly to root disturbance during transplants, so it’s recommended that you plant it in its permanent place to prevent root shock.

Other Common Names: King Palm, Piccabeen Palm, and Illawara Palm

Growing Zones: 9-11

Average Size at Maturity: 20-40 ft tall, 10-15 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in early summer, and fruits appear in late summer

19. Lady Palm (Rhapis excelsa) – Non-Native Tree

Bamboo Palm, Broaddleaf Lady Palm, Fan Tufted Palm, Lady Palm (Rhapis excelsa)
Images by Fern Berg, Own Work, for Tree Vitalize

Native to China and Vietnam, the Lady Palm is a broadleaf evergreen that can be containerized for indoor gardens. Besides removing airborne toxins, the Lady Palm purifies the air and requires less humidity to thrive. The Lady Palm thrives in moist, well-draining soils and prefers partial and deep shade to thrive.

Many people prefer placing the Lady Palm near doors or inside posh indoor environments, including resorts, spas, and malls. Its multiple trunks and deep-green fan-shaped fronds make the palm stand out from the crowd! Considering its size, the Lady Palm makes an excellent accent tree for small landscapes.

The tree is fairly disease-free, but over or underwatering can quickly affect its roots, leading to a host of other problems. The tree produces beautiful gold flowers, followed by white berry-like fruits containing the palm’s seeds. With a moderate growth rate, the Lady Palm pairs well with the Areca Palm in an indoor setting.

Other Common Names: Bamboo Palm, Broadleaf Lady Palm, Fan Tufted Palm, Lady Palm

Growing Zones: 9-11

Average Size at Maturity: 6-15 ft tall, 6-15 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring, and fruits appear in late summer

Available at: Fast-Growing-Trees

20. Windmill Palm (Trachycarpus fortunei) – Non-Native Tree

Windmill Palm
Image by Dana L. Brown via Flickr

Looking for a tree that speaks volumes without a word? The Windmill Palm should top your list of palm trees! Native to central and eastern China, the tree is a sight to behold.

Although it can grow up to 40 feet tall, the tree is often pruned to maintain a 10 feet height to make it easy to maintain. Transform your garden or entryway by planting these trees alongside each other.

The fibers in Windmill Palm tree’s leaves are often used in weaving. The tree can be containerized, but it prefers a location with at least six hours of direct sunlight. During early summer, the tree decorates itself with gold or green flowers, followed by blue, gold, or lavender inedible fruits containing one seed each.

Compared to other palm trees, the Windmill Palm is a tough tree that can withstand drought and salt. It can also survive temperatures as low as 10 degrees Fahrenheit, making it one of the most popular trees in Florida.

Other Common Names: Chinese Fan Palm, Chinese Windmill Palm, Chusan Palm, Fortunes Palm, Windmill Palm

Growing Zones: 7-11

Average Size at Maturity: 20-40 ft tall, 6-7 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in early summer

Available at: Fast-Growing-Trees & Nature Hills

21. Needle Palm (Rhapidophyllum hystrix)

Needle Palm
Image by Christopher Sessums via Flickr

If you’re looking for a way to transform your indoor and outdoor space into a dreamy getaway, the Needle Palm is the magic tree you need! Not only can this tree survive temperatures as low as -15 degrees Fahrenheit, but due to its slow growth and germination rate, it’s listed as threatened species by the State of Florida.

As the name suggests, the bark and foliage of this tree are somewhat sharp and can hurt your skin if you don’t handle it with care. Due to its sharpness, the copper or burgundy fruits it produces in the fall are difficult to reach and often dry on the tree. Although the fruits aren’t edible, they’re extremely important for germination.

The Needle Palm prefers full sun and partial shade and thrives in moist, well-draining soils with high organic content. The Needle Palm is a natural humidifier and helps improve air quality by reducing airborne toxins. Whether indoor or outdoor, the Needle Palm is a winner either way!

Other Common Names: Blue Palmetto, Needle Palm, Porcupine Palm

Growing Zones: 5-11

Average Size at Maturity: 3-6 ft tall, 4-8 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring and early summer, and fruits appear in fall

Available at: Fast-Growing-Trees

22. Parlor Palm (Chamaedorea elegans) – Non-Native Tree

Parlor Palm
Image by Forest and Kim Starr via Flickr

If you prefer smaller palms that can be containerized and brought indoors, the Parlor Palm will sweep you off your feet! Native to Mexico and Honduras, this palm’s trunk or stem is green like bamboo, but the fronds resemble those of the Areca Palm, another great indoor palm tree.

If trimmed regularly, the tree reaches four feet high, but without pruning and in ideal conditions, it can become 12 feet tall! A cluster of Parlor Palm makes great privacy screens on high balconies and pergolas. However, this tree requires conditions similar to its tropical habitat to thrive.

In early summer, the palm adorns beautiful gold, green, orange, and burgundy flowers, which are soon followed by green fruits that turn black when ripe. The fruits are not edible and can cause an allergic reaction when ingested. The Parlor Palm prefers dappled sunlight and deep shade and thrives in moist, loamy soils with high organic content.

Other Common Names: Bamboo Palm, Chamaedorea, Collinia Elegans, Dwarf Palm, Good Luck Palm, Miniature Fish Tail Dwarf Palm, Neanthebella, Neanthe Bella Palm, Neanthe Palm, Parlor Palm, Parlour Palm, Reed Palm

Growing Zones: 10-12

Average Size at Maturity: 2-12 ft tall, 2-3 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in early summer

Available at: Fast-Growing-Trees & Nature Hills

23. Paurotis Palm (Acoelorrhaphe wrightii)

Paurotis Palm
Image by Pamla J. Eisenberg via Flickr

If you’d rather grow a bushy palm tree to remind you of the great wild outdoors, the Paurotis Palm fits the bill!

It’s a multi-stemmed evergreen palm that boasts slender ash-grey trunks and thick fan-shaped green leaves two feet across each! If pruned and trained well, the leaves can hide the trunk, making it look like the tree’s floating in thin air!

To make the trunk visible, you only need to prune the lower fronds and maintain the look. The tree boasts beautiful creamy-white flowers in spring, which pave the way for orange-berry-like fruits. When ripe, the fruit turns black, ready to be consumed by birds and small mammals.

Although the fruit is edible, they’re somewhat acrid and leave you with a rather unpleasant aftertaste. Native to Florida, the Paurotis Palm thrives in full sun and prefers moist, well-draining soils to grow. It’s the perfect choice for people yearning for a tropical effect in their landscapes!

Other Common Names: Everglades Palm, Silver Saw Palmetto, Saw Cabbage Palm, Madeira Palm

Growing Zones: 9-11

Average Size at Maturity: 20-30 ft tall, 20-30 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in late spring, and fruits appear in late summer

24. Queen Palm (Syagrus romanzoffiana) – Non-Native Tree

Queen Palm Syagrus romanzoffiana - leaves flowers - Sin Medieterraneo .cultivation 2020-04-30
Image by Lyrae Willis for Tree Vitalize

Queen Palm, much like its name, deserves large gardens and landscapes for healthy growth! With slender trunks and bright green feather-like fronds, this palm is a sight to behold all year round. The Queen Palm’s fronds can reach 15 feet long, giving this tree a large canopy besides its ash-grey ringed trunk.

The tree produces heavy clusters of cream flowers in the spring and summer, which soon transform into yellowish-orange dates. These fruits are edible but require much effort for a bite-sized snack, discouraging many people from harvesting them. The fruits are either sweet, mildly sweet, or bland, depending on their ripeness.

Overall, ripe fruits taste like a blend of plums and bananas! In ideal conditions, Queen Palm can live up to 150 years! It prefers full sun and thrives in moist, well-draining soils. The tree can withstand temperatures as low as 25 degrees Fahrenheit, although the cold can temporarily damage its leaves.

Other Common Names: Cocos Palm, Cocos Plumosa, Jeriva

Growing Zones: 9-11

Average Size at Maturity: 50-70 ft tall, 20-30 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring and early summer, and fruits appear in late summer

Available at: Fast-Growing-Trees & Nature Hills

25. Red Latan Palm Tree (Latania lontaroides) – Non-Native Tree

Red Latan Palm
Image by gérard via Flickr

Native to the Mascarene Islands, the Red Latan Palm Tree gets its name from the red hue displayed on young leaf petioles. This tree’s trunk is slightly swollen at the base, and as it ages, it goes from ash-grey to black. Its fan-shaped leaves are about eight feet wide and five feet long, turning bright yellow to brown as they age.

During spring, the tree produces clusters of tiny yellow flowers, followed by edible brownish-green fruits that taste like coconuts. However, most fruits are bland with a somewhat dry aftertaste. The Red Latan Palm can be containerized for indoor gardens and can truly transform your indoor space!

The tree prefers full sun and partial shade and thrives in moist, well-draining soils. The tree is fairly cold-hardy and can tolerate temperatures as low as 20 degrees Fahrenheit. Much like other palm trees, cold temperatures will temporarily damage the tree’s leaves, which will return as temperatures warm up.

Other Common Names: Red Latan, Latanier de la Réunion, Latanier Rouge

Growing Zones: 10-12

Average Size at Maturity: 30-40 ft tall, 15-20 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring, and fruits appear in summer

26. Lipstick Palm (Cyrtostachys renda) – Non-Native Tree

Lipstick Palm
Image by Forest and Kim Starr via Flickr

How about a palm tree with a striking appearance? The Lipstick Palm gets its name from its glossy crimson stalks and stems that you can see from miles away! The palm can be containerized for indoor gardens and looks spectacular in outdoor spaces. It’s a slow-growing tree that’ll add depth and character to theme gardens.

They make excellent privacy screens for porches and pergolas. Native to Sumatra and Thailand, the Lipstick Palm is a fantastic way to transform your driveway into a secret getaway! In spring, the tree produces green, white, red, or cream flowers that create a stunning contrast against the palm’s bright green leaves and red sheaths.

These flowers soon pave the way for inedible black fruits, a favorite among birds. The Lipstick Palm prefers full sun and thrives in moist, well-draining soils. However, it’s high maintenance and requires some effort to maintain its exotic look!

Other Common Names: Red Sealing Wax Palm, Sealing Wax Palm, Pinang Raja, Maharaja Palm

Growing Zones: 11-12

Average Size at Maturity: 25-35 ft tall, 12-20 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring

27. Ribbon Fan Palm (Livistona decipiens) – Non-Native Tree

Ribbon Fan Palm
Image via Urban Tropicals

Native to Australia, the Ribbon Fan Palm is also known as the Weeping Palm due to its drooping frond ends. Growing from a single trunk, its crown is jam-packed with bright green leaves with drooping ends. While a single tree can transform any space, a group of two or more trees can bring out a wow factor in any landscape!

Although the Ribbon Palm can survive indoors, it needs a lot of space for healthy growth; hence, it’s recommended to plant it outdoors. While the tree is fairly drought-tolerant, it’ll appreciate extra watering when the outdoor temperatures are high. Frequent standing water can cause root rot.

In spring, the tree adorns its branches with clusters of yellow blooms that transform into inedible black fruits that are a significant part of a bird’s diet. The Ribbon Palm prefers full sun and deep shade and thrives in moist, well-draining soils with high organic matter.

Other Common Names: Fountain Palm, Weeping Cabbage Palm, Weeping Palm

Growing Zones: 9-11

Average Size at Maturity: 25-35 ft tall, 12-20 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring

28. Saw Palmetto (Serenoa repens)

Saw Palmetto
Image by Marianne Serra via Flickr

Native to Florida, the Saw Palmetto is a small palm “tree” that acts as a fantastic privacy hedge or screen to keep your patio safe from curious eyes!

In addition, they’re great for bordering your landscape and attracting beneficial pollinators, including birds and bees. The Saw Palmetto grows slowly and can live up to 100 years in ideal conditions!

If left unattended, the tree can grow up to 15 feet tall in the wild, but in urban landscapes, it’s pruned to maintain the classic height of eight feet. In spring and summer, the Saw Palmetto produces panicles of gold and white flowers, which pave the way for black and gold fruits.

The palm’s edible fruits have a somewhat sweet aroma and acrid taste. In the early 1900s, people consumed the berries as food and medicine. The Saw Palmetto prefers full sun and thrives in loamy soils with high organic matter.

Other Common Names: Saw Palmetto, Scrub Palmetto, Silver Saw Palmetto

Growing Zones: 8-11

Average Size at Maturity: 4-15 ft tall, 4-6 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring and summer, and fruits appear in fall

29. Solitaire Palm (Ptychosperma elegans) – Non-Native Tree

Solitaire Palm
Image by daniel rengel via Flickr

Native to Australia, the Solitaire Palm has two fruiting seasons, making it a popular tree among gardeners.

In spring, large sprays of yellowish-green flowers adorn the tree’s crown, which are shortly followed by orangish-red fruits attached to thick yellow stems. The edible fruits can be eaten raw, boiled, or pureed. The fruits are sweet with a slightly tart aftertaste.

The Solitaire Palm prefers full sun and thrives in moist, well-draining soils. However, they’re not drought-tolerant and will appreciate an extra drink of water when it’s hot outside. The orangish-red fruits create a stunning contrast against the palm’s dark green leaves, and light grey ringed trunk.

The Solitaire Palm is a slow grower, and due to the heights, don’t plant it too close to immovable structures, overhead utility lines, and underground pipes. They can survive temperatures as low as 29 degrees Fahrenheit and need insulation during bitter cold months.

Other Common Names: Alexander Palm, Elegant Palm

Growing Zones: 10-11

Average Size at Maturity: 20-30 ft tall, 10-15 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring, and fruits appear in summer and late winter

30. Sylvester Palm (Phoenix sylvestris)

Sylvester Palm
Image by Dinesh Valke via Flickr

Native to India, Nepal, and Myanmar, the Sylvester Palm is well-known for its sweet bite-size fruit and sap from flower stalks. The fruits are similar to dates, while the sap is used to make an alcoholic drink in India. The palm’s unique diamond-patterned trunk sets it apart from other palm varieties!

In spring, the palm decorates itself with heavy clusters of beautiful white flowers, which are soon followed by edible orange fruits that turn dark red to purple when ripe. The fruits are extremely sweet and sticky when mature; however, not all fruits share the same sweetness. Some may be bland and have an unpleasant taste.

The Sylvester Palm prefers full sun and partial shade and thrives in moist, well-draining soils. While it can tolerate occasional neglect, frequent standing water can set rot that can damage your tree. In ideal conditions, this palm tree’s lifespan is up to 40 years!

Other Common Names: Silver Date Palm, Indian Date, Sugar Date Palm, Khejur, Wild Date Palm, Toddy Palm, Indian Winepalm

Growing Zones: 8-11

Average Size at Maturity: 25-50 ft tall, 10-15 ft wide

Fruiting/Flowering Season: Flowers in spring and early summer, and fruits appear in late summer

Available at: Fast-Growing-Trees

Florida – The Hub of Palm Trees!

Florida is home to various types of palm trees, of which some are native, and others come from around the world. Add beauty, character, and a hint of mystery to your landscapes with these exotic tropical show-stoppers!

Whether you have a large or compact garden, you can transform your indoor or outdoor space with various palm tree species! However, consider their growing conditions before bringing them home to give them a chance for healthy growth.

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