Clicky

5 Fastest Growing Apricot Trees That Bear Fruit Quickly (1st Year)

Last Updated:
Photo of author

Expert Gardener & Horticulturist in Training

This article may contain affiliate links. We may earn a small commission if you purchase via these links. Learn more.
Home » Fruit Trees » 5 Fastest Growing Apricot Trees That Bear Fruit Quickly (1st Year)

Apricots are delicious.

Planting an apricot seed and waiting years for the tree to grow and produce fruit is not on many gardeners bucket lists.

Growing apricots on your tree as fast as possible is!

I scoured loads of nurseries to find five apricot trees that are highly likely to bear fruit within the 1st year of planting.

Lets check them out!

1. Moorpark – Prunus armeniaca ‘Moorpark’

Moorpark apricot trees can bear fruit in their first year after planting, according to Fast-Growing-Trees.

The Moorpark apricot tree is a heritage variety cherished for its late-season, large, yellow-skinned fruit with a red blush and succulent, aromatic flesh.

Loved for its rich flavor, the quick fruiting Moorpark is excellent for fresh eating, drying, and canning.

This self-pollinating tree blooms with pale pink flowers a bit later in the season, offering resistance to late spring frosts and performing well in rainy spring climates.

The fruit ripens in stages, extending the fresh harvest period. While it is self-fertile, adding another apricot variety can significantly increase the yield, making it a prized addition to any edible garden or landscape.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4-8
  • Mature Tree Size: 15-20 ft tall, 10-20 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: Can Fruit 1st Year
  • Avg Growth Rate: Moderate
  • Chill Hours: 600
  • Self Fertile: Yes. Planting another apricot variety will increase yield.

Shop Now:

Fast-Growing-Trees, Nature Hills or Starkbro’s

2. Blenheim – Prunus armeniaca ‘Blenheim’

Blenheim apricot trees can bear fruit in their first year after planting, according to Fast-Growing-Trees.

The Blenheim apricot tree is a world-renowned variety prized for its mid-season, sweet, aromatic, and juicy pale orange fruits.

The Blenheim is perfect for fresh eating, juicing, drying, and canning, making it a standout choice for any apricot enthusiast.

This self-pollinating tree dazzles in spring with gorgeous pink and white blooms, setting the stage for a bountiful harvest. While it is capable of producing fruit on its own, partnering with other trees can significantly increase yield.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5-9
  • Mature Tree Size: 12-18 ft tall, 6-10 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: Can Fruit 1st Year
  • Avg Growth Rate: Moderate
  • Chill Hours: 400
  • Self Fertile: Yes. Planting another apricot tree will increase yield.

Shop Now:

Fast-Growing-Trees, Nature Hills or Starkbro’s

3. Chinese – Prunus armeniaca ‘Chinese’

Chinese apricot trees can bear fruit in their first year after planting, according to Fast-Growing-Trees.

The Chinese apricot tree, also known as the Chinese Mormon apricot, stands out as a frost-resistant and cold hardy variety, ideal for climates susceptible to late spring frosts.

This tree not only graces the landscape with its fragrant, pink-hued white flowers in spring but also produces deliciously sweet, yellow-orange freestone fruits.

Adaptable to various soil types, the Chinese apricot requires 700 chill hours and is self-fruitful, ensuring a bountiful harvest even without a pollinator partner.

Its moderate growth rate and manageable size make it a perfect addition to any garden or orchard, offering both aesthetic appeal and the tastiest fruit.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4-7
  • Mature Tree Size: 10-15 ft tall, 8-10 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: Can Fruit 1st Year
  • Avg Growth Rate: Moderate
  • Chill Hours: 700
  • Self Fertile: Yes. Planting another apricot tree will increase yield.

Shop Now:

Fast-Growing-Trees, Nature Hills, or Starkbro’s

4. Gold Kist – Prunus armeniaca ‘Gold Kist’

Gold Kist apricot trees can bear fruit in their first year after planting, according to Fast-Growing-Trees.

The Gold Kist apricot tree is a semi-dwarf variety that thrives in warmer winter climates, offering a vibrant and flavorful harvest perfect for backyard gardens.

This apricot is planted for its superior quality and ease of cultivation, producing large yields of juicy, freestone apricots ideal for fresh eating or culinary use.

With a minimal chill hour requirement, this quick fruiting, self-fertile tree is popular with gardeners in USDA zones 7-10.

Its manageable size and moderate growth rate make it an excellent choice for gardeners looking to enjoy the freshest apricots from their own tree.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 7-10
  • Mature Tree Size: 10-15 ft tall, 6-8 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: Can Fruit 1st Year
  • Avg Growth Rate: Moderate
  • Chill Hours: 300
  • Self Fertile: Yes. Planting another apricot tree will increase yield.

Shop Now:

Fast-Growing-Trees

5. Puget Gold – Prunus armeniaca ‘Puget Gold’

Puget Gold apricot trees can bear fruit in their first year after planting, according to Fast-Growing-Trees.

The Puget Gold apricot tree is celebrated for its late-season harvest and exceptional flavor, offering a bountiful yield of elongated, bright orange-fleshed fruit.

This variety stands out for its resilience to late spring frosts and prolific production, making it a reliable choice for gardeners.

While self-pollinating and capable of producing fruit with just one tree, planting two or more can significantly increase your harvest.

The Puget Gold is not only excellent for fresh eating but also ideal for canning and preserves, with fruit that stores well for weeks.

Developed in the Pacific Northwest, it is disease-resistant, easy to care for, and adaptable to a wide range of climates.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5-9
  • Mature Tree Size: 12-15 ft tall, 5-8 ft wide
  • Time to Bear First Fruit: Can Fruit 1st Year
  • Avg Growth Rate: Moderate
  • Chill Hours: 600
  • Self Fertile: Yes. Planting another apricot tree will increase yield.

Shop Now:

Fast-Growing-Trees, Nature Hills or Starkbro’s

Comparing The Fastest Bearing Apricot Trees

VarietyUSDA Growing ZonesMature Tree SizeTime to Bear First FruitAvg Growth RateChill HoursSelf Fertile
Moorpark4-815-20 ft tall, 10-20 ft wideCan Fruit 1st YearModerate600Yes
Blenheim5-912-18 ft tall, 6-10 ft wideCan Fruit 1st YearModerate400Yes
Chinese4-710-15 ft tall, 8-10 ft wideCan Fruit 1st YearModerate700Yes
Gold Kist7-1010-15 ft tall, 6-8 ft wideCan Fruit 1st YearModerate300Yes
Puget Gold5-912-15 ft tall, 5-8 ft wideCan Fruit 1st YearModerate600Yes
*Growth rates are approximations; actual performance varies with climate, soil, and care.

Why Time to Bear Fruit Differs

A wide variety of cultivation methods are employed by nurseries which means the time until a tree produces its first fruit can vary significantly from one nursery to another.

Grafting and budding are preferred for accurately reproducing specific apricot varieties and tend to lead to earlier fruit production.

For many, buying a grafted apricot tree from a nursery represents the easiest and fastest method to begin cultivating apricots.

My approach to finding the fastest-fruiting apricot trees involved reviewing multiple reputable nurseries to identify those with the quickest growth times for their specific apricot trees.

I then compiled information regarding tree size, growing zones, chill hours and more, to help you choose the best tree for your yard.

A Note on Apricot Tree Size

Nurseries provide a variety of apricot tree sizes for sale, with the smaller trees generally being more affordable.

If your aim is to achieve apricot production as quickly as possible, we recommend opting for a more established tree.

For instance, Fast Growing Trees offers the Kieffer apricot tree in three sizes: 4-5 ft tall, 5-6 ft tall, and 6-7 ft tall.

Additionally, some nurseries, categorize their trees by mature size, offering Dwarf, Semi-Dwarf, and Standard options, each maturing to a distinct size.

It’s important to verify the size of the tree at the nursery to ensure it is suitable for your specific yard and meets your needs.

Chill Hour Requirements

Selecting a tree suited to your area’s climate requires paying attention to its chill hour requirements, essential for its growth and fruit-bearing potential.

Apricot trees, for example, need a specific number of cold weather hours, with temperatures ranging from 35 to 45 degrees Fahrenheit, each year to successfully flower and produce fruit.

Insufficient chill hours can lead to inadequate flowering, limited fruit production and poor leaf growth.

Apricot Tree Pollination

Many apricot trees are self fertile, however it is always important to check to find out if the fruit tree you are interested in is.

Planting several apricot trees can greatly improve pollination and fruit production through cross-pollination, the process where pollen from the flowers of one apricot tree fertilizes another.

Cross-pollination not only boosts the number of fruits but also contributes to larger and better quality fruits.

Thus, planting two or more compatible apricot varieties near each other can lead to a more dependable and plentiful yield.

Other Fast-Fruiting Trees

Interested in expanding your home orchard beyond the usual apricot trees?

Explore the potential with pear, peach, apple, cherry, lemon, and fig trees, discovering which varieties offer rapid growth and early fruit production.

Happy planting!

Photo of author

Fern Berg - Founder

Expert Gardener & Horticulturist in Training

Fern has planted and currently cares for over 100 different native and exotic fruit, nut, and ornamental trees. She also cultivates an extensive vegetable garden, several flower gardens and cares for an ever-growing happy family of indoor plants. Fern has a special interest in biodynamic farming, food production and closed loop agriculture. Fern founded Tree Vitalize to help guide others with an interest in tree planting, identification and care.